New Arrivals    Books    Archival Products   Charts   Newsletters   Upcoming Events   Contact Us  

Popular Categories

   How-To - Genealogy Misc.
   How-To - Write & Publish
   How-To - Conservation
      - Acadie, Acadian
      - New Brunswick
      - Newfoundland & Lab.
      - Nova Scotia
      - Ontario
      - Prince Edward Island
      - Quebec
      - Western Canada
      - First Nations, Metis
      - Military - Before 1920
      - Loyalists / UEL
      - Pioneers' Stories
   British Home Children
   England & Wales
   Ireland & Northern Ireland
   United States
      - American Revolution
   more countries...

   Archival Products

   Genealogy Charts

   Gift Certificates

Popular Authors

   Thomas MacEntee
   Paul Milner
   Chris Paton
   Ron W. Shaw
   Gavin K. Watt

Popular Publishers

   Global Heritage Press
   MacDonald Research
   OGS - Ottawa Branch
   Unlock The Past

Search by topic, title, author or word:

News & How-To
Formerly branded as

Articles, press releases,and how-to information for everyone interested in genealogy and history

Subscribe to our free newsletter

Following article posted August 20, 2000, Vol. IV Number 14

Roving Reporters
   Contributed by: Fawne Stratford-Devai,

Researching Ontario Wills & Probate

I have noticed a number of questions recently regarding Wills & probate records for Ontario. The Archives of Ontario is the repository for those will which have been probated. Information about Wills is available on the Archives of Ontario website - specifically:

Under the section "Conducting Research at the Archives of Ontario" ( is a link to the information handouts which are found in the main reading room. Researchers would be well advised to read those handouts which explain the availability and use of wills and probate records:

#15 How to Find a Will (HTML version):

Before 1859, estates were dispersed either by the provincial Court of Probate or the local Surrogate Courts. The Court of Probate (Series RG 22-155) handled estates with property in two or more Districts valued over 5. The Surrogate Courts handled estates with property within one District. With the abolition of the Court of Probate in 1858, the Surrogate Courts assumed complete responsibility for estate actions.

Many years ago, the Archives created two surname Indexes of Estate Files * before 1859 * -- these indexes are available online at:

COURT OF PROBATE - Inventory 22, Appendix A1 (formerly Appendix F): SURROGATE COURT INDEX - Inventory 22, Appendix A25 (formerly Appendix H):

Researchers would be well advised to carefully read the online information for wills at:

For those researching in York County, things are somewhat more complex but are carefully explained in the York County Surrogate Court Records section of the inter-loan catalogue at:

Generation Press has been working for a number of years to provide indexes to probate records by county for the period 1858-1900. These indexes are available for searching in the main reading room of the Archives and are available in many libraries. They can be purchased from Global Genealogy at: , and then click on the county for which you have an interest. Or call 1-800-361-5168.

There are indexes for the following counties that I am aware of: Brant, Carleton, Dufferin, Elgin, Essex, Frontenac, Haldimand, Halton Hastings, Kent, Lambton, Lanark, Leeds & Grenville, Lennox & Addington Lincoln, Norfolk, Northumberland & Durham, Ontario, Peel, Peterborough Prescott & Russell, Prince Edward, Renfrew, Simcoe, Stormont, Dundas & Glengarry, Victoria, Waterloo, Welland.

Microfilm of probate records (wills) can be borrowed on inter library loan from the Archives for those records that have been microfilmed. Please read the online information carefully...unfortunately, not all wills have been probated and not all probated records have been microfilmed....

As the Archives' information handout clearly explains, Not all wills are probated:
    "If the deceased's estate consisted ONLY of real estate (e.g. farmers), the original Will may have been deposited in the local Land Registry Office to transfer the land to the heirs. Some Land Registry Offices hold over 60% of all surviving Wills. Because they were never probated, these Wills are not indexed or registered in the court records."
To find the address for the Land Registry Office in the county where your research falls, check the website for the Association for the Preservation of Ontario Land Registry Office Documents (APOLROD) at:

The Land Registry Offices fall under the Ministry of Consumer and Commercial Relations (Real Property Registration) which has a website at: which will also take you to a list of Land Registry Offices with an explanation of the service each provides.

I hope these links and online information will assist those in search of Ontario probate records & wills in general. Inc. 1992-2018
Sign up for our free newsletter!   |   Unsubscribe from our newsletter

History & Master Roll
Jessup's Loyal Rangers

Loyalists - American Revolution