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BOOK - History of New Brunswick - Two Volumes in One
By: James Hannay
Originally published by John A. Bowes, St. John, 1909
This edition published by Global Heritage Press, Milton 2006 (CD 2010)


Hardcover...113.95 (C$)
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Hardcover Edition




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Originally published in 1909, History of New Brunswick is the definitive book on the early history and settlement of the Canadian province of New Brunswick up to 1909. Hannay deals with a lengthy list of topics best shown by the following list of topics from the book's table of contents:
  • Author's Note
  • The Discovery of Acadia by Cabot. -- Champlain's Voyages. -- Settlement of St. Croix Island. -- DeMonts and Port Royal. -- Jesuit Missions in Acadia. -- LaTour and Charnisay. -- Lady LaTour, the Acadian Heroine.
  • Ruin of LaTour. -- Death of Charnisay. -- The English Capture of Acadia. -- It is restored to France by the Treaty of Breda. -- Settlement of Chignecto. -- Villebon on the St. John. -- Siege of Fort Nashwaak by the English.
  • Death of Villebon. -- Colonel Church ravages Chignecto. -- French Settlers on the St. John River. -- The Headquarters removed to Port Royal. -- Port Royal captured by the English. -- The St. John River deserted. -- Building of Beausejour.
  • Settlement of Halifax by Cornwallis. -- The War on the Isthmus. -- Beausejour captured by the English. -- Expulsion of the Acadians. -- The French driven from the St. John River. -- The Capture of Quebec.
  • Canada surrendered to Great Britain. -- New England Settlers on the St. John. -- Progress of Settlement on the North Shore. -- Settlements at Chignecto and Shepody. -- Governor Wilmot's large grants of land. -- Troubles in the New England Colonies. -- Settlement of Campobello.
  • The American Revolution. -- Maugerville Settlers in sympathy with their friends in New England. -- Rebel raids on Nova Scotia. -- Weak state of the Province. -- Disloyal conduct of the Cumberland Settlers.
  • The Maugerville Resolutions. -- Colonel Allan on the St. John River. -- Colonel Eddy's attack on Fort Cumberland. -- Flight of the Rebels to Machias. -- Erection of Fort Howe. VIII End of the War of the Revolution. -- Severe Treatment of the Loyalists. -- Their Emigration to Nova Scotia in 1783. -- 30,000 Loyalists are settled in the Province. -- Founding of the City of St. John. -- New Brunswick separated from Nova Scotia. -- Arrival of Governor Carleton.
  • State of New Brunswick in 1784. -- The first Legislature. -- The Province organized and the Council formed. -- Troubles at the first Election in St. John. -- Unfair Conduct of the Governor's friends.
  • The Constitution of the Province. -- All the power in the hands of the Governor. -- A few favored families receive all the offices. -- The oppressive Table of Fees. -- Lack of Executive Responsibility. -- The Council exercises Legislative functions. -- Its Proceedings not open to the Public.
  • The first Meeting of the Legislature. -- The St. John Petition. -- The shameful legislation against petitions. -- How free speech was gagged. -- Marriage and Divorce Legislation.
  • The first Militia Bill. -- The state of the Public Roads. -- Arrival of the Loyalist Commissioners. -- The Removal of the Capital to Fredericton. -- The Payment of Members.
  • Troubles with the Indians. -- The New England Co. and its work. -- Glenie the Reformer. -- The qualification of Voters and Members. -- Slaves in New Brunswick.
  • Restrictions on the Lumber Trade. -- A new Legislature elected. -- Difficulties between the Assembly and the Council. -- Weakness of the Governor's following. -- On the eve of war.
  • The King's New Brunswick Regiment. -- Measures for the Defence of the Province. -- Boundary Disputes with the United States. -- Visit of the Duke of Kent.
  • Difficulties between the two Houses. -- Contest over the Supreme Court Bill. -- Quit Rents. -- The Boundary between New Brunswick and Maine.
  • A Member of the Assembly sentenced to death. -- Contest over the Appointment of Clerk of the House. -- A war of Pamphlets. -- Parish School Legislation.
  • A New Election. -- Bad state of the roads. -- The Province is Progressing. -- Growth of Ship Building. -- Agriculture the leading Industry. -- Departure of Governor Carleton. -- The Province administered by a President.
  • Smuggling on the Border. -- A Fisheries Dispute. -- Death of President Ludlow. -- A new Legislature elected. -- Rapid Growth of the Revenue.
  • War with the United States. -- Measures for the defence of the Province. -- Steam boat legislation. -- Administration of General Smyth. -- A State of Neutrality on the Border. -- The New Brunswick Regiment marches to Quebec in the Winter. -- Another Regiment raised in the Province. -- Success of the British Arms.
  • A new Education Act. -- The plaster trade. -- Purchase of Government House. -- Famine threatened in the Province. -- The New Brunswick Regiments disbanded.
  • Emigrants coming to the Province from Great Britain. -- Introduction of Madras Schools. -- The Timber Reserves. -- Quit Rents. -- Contest between the Assembly and the Lieutenant-Governor. He dissolves the Legislature in a pet.
  • The Revival of interest in Agriculture. -- Measures to Promote Colonization. -- Formation of new Settlements. -- The trade of the Province increasing. -- A fatal duel.
  • Death of Governor Smyth. -- The first census of the Province. -- Sir Howard Douglas becomes Governor. -- Kings College. -- The great Miramichi Fire. -- The panic of 1825.
  • The Imperial Customs Duties. -- Restrictions on Provincial Trade. -- Agitation for Reform. -- Enormous Customs House salaries. -- Attempt to enforce Quit Rents. -- Troubles in the Aroostook country.
  • Marriage Legislation. -- The Catholic Relief Bill. -- Reform of the Criminal law. -- Death of George IV. -- The Rise of The Temperance Party. -- The Casual and Territorial Revenue. -- The Province claims the Control of its own Crown Lands.
  • A Committee on Grievances. -- Delegation to England. -- Conflict with Sir Archibald Campbell. -- The second Delegation to England. -- Efforts of the Governor to Defeat the Assembly. -- The Crown Lands pass into the Control of the Province.
  • The Cholera threatened. -- Another Committee on Grievances. -- The Heavyside defalcation. -- L. A. Wilmot enters public life. -- Railway legislation. -- Sir John Harvey becomes Governor.
  • Death of William IV. -- Reforming the Election Laws. -- The Agitation for Responsible Government. -- The Aroostook War. -- Troops sent to the front. -- The trouble settled by the Ashburton Treaty. -- The care of the insane.
  • Postal Reform. -- Coasting trade with Nova Scotia. -- Lord John Russell on the Tenure of Public Office. -- The Legislative term reduced to four years. -- The Initiation of Money Votes. -- Mr. Charles Fisher as a Reformer.
  • The Reade Case. -- Inconsistent conduct of the Government. -- The Doak and Hill case. -- Charter of Kings College. -- A railway to Quebec. -- A new Education Act.
  • Earl Gray on Tenure of Office. -- Responsible Government indorsed. -- An era of Railway Legislation. -- Major Robinson's survey. -- The St. John and Shediac Railway.
  • Another general election. -- Defeat of the Supporters of the Government. -- L. A. Wilmot appointed Judge.
  • More delegations to England. -- Failure of the Intercolonial negotiations. -- Jackson and Co. undertake to build our Railways. -- Responsible Government established. -- A Visitation of the Cholera. -- Downfall of the old Government. -- Mr. Tilley becomes Provincial Secretary.
  • The Prohibitory Liquor Law. -- Governor Manners Sutton dissolves the House. -- The friends of Temperance defeated. -- The Gray-Wilmot Government. -- Tilley and Fisher again in power.
  • The visit of the Prince of Wales. -- The Crown Land Investigation. -- The Railway opened to Shediac. -- Another Colonial delegation. -- The discussion of Maritime Union.
  • Proposals for Confederation. -- The Quebec scheme. -- Defeat of Confederation in New Brunswick. -- The Smith-Anglin Government. -- Fisher's victory in York.
  • Difficulties of the Government. -- The Fenian Invasion of New Brunswick. -- Mr. Tilley again in power. -- Confederation carried in New Brunswick. -- Delegates go to England. -- The British North America Act.
  • The Confederation of the Provinces. -- Changes in the Constitution. -- Mr. Wetmore becomes Attorney General.
  • The Legislative Council. -- Its Conflict with the Government. -- The route of the Intercolonial Railway. -- The Establishment of Free Schools.
  • Death of George L. Hatheway. -- The King Government. -- The School Law attacked in Parliament. -- The Costigan Resolutions. -- The Law sustained by the Privy Council. -- Education in Gloucester County. -- Mr. LeCelles in the School Agitation. -- The Legislative Council's views of Schools.
  • The General Election of 1874. -- The Caraquet Riot. -- The School Law Sustained. The Assessment Act. -- Agriculture. -- Orange Incorporation. -- Maritime Union. -- Progress in Railway Building. -- The Route of the Intercolonial. -- The Short Line to Montreal. -- The great St. John Fire of 1877.
  • Political Parties in the House. -- The National Policy. -- Death of Governor Chandler. -- Parliament Buildings Destroyed. -- Attempt to Remove the Capital to St. John. -- English Agricultural Delegates visit New Brunswick. -- The St. John Bridge Company.
  • Retirement of Mr. Fraser. -- The Hanington Government. -- Its Defeat. -- The first Blair Government. -- The Franchise Bill. -- Abolition of the Legislative Council. -- The St. John Union Bill. -- Sir Wm. Wilson's Speech.
  • The Short Line to Montreal. -- The Harvey-Salisbury Railway. -- St. John aspires to be the Winter Port. -- Growth of St. John's Trade. -- The Ritchie Police-Magistrate Appointment. -- The Government Defeated in St. John and Northumberland. -- The Bathurst School Difficulty.
  • The Mitchell Government. -- Mr. Emmerson becomes Premier. -- Mr. Tweedie succeeds to the Premiership. Is appointed Lieutenant-Governor. -- The Robinson Government. -- Defeated at the General Elections. -- The Hazen Government.
  • APPENDIX - in eight parts.
    • A Early Church History - The Roman Catholic Church
    • B Early Church History - The Congregational Church
    • C Early Church History - The Church of England
    • D Early Church History - The Presbyterian Church
    • E Early Church History - The Baptist Church
    • F Early Church History - The Methodist Church
    • G Banking in New Brunswick
    • H Educational Progress in New Brunswick, by Dr. J. R. Inch, LL.D., Superintendent of Education
About the author: James Hannay became the most influential New Brunswick historian of the late-19th and early-20th century. He wrote several books and articles on the early history and settlement of New Brunswick, the most influential being this, The History of New Brunswick.

The work was originally published in a two volume set. This historical reprint has been reproduced in a larger than original format and is bound into a single hardcover volume.

Details
  • 455 + 454 = 909 pages (two volumes in one)

  • 7.5" X 10.5"

  • Index
  • Originally published by John A. Bowes, St. John, 1909

  • This edition published by Global Heritage Press, Milton, 2006 (CD 2010)

  • ISBN: 1-894378-95-4 (hardcover)

  • Hardcover (hunter green with gilt stamping on front and spine)




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